Travelgirlmag

Not Just Fiddlin’ Around

Harvey Fierstein as Tevye in "Fiddler on the Roof." Photo by Joan Marcus

By Jan Schroder

Wishing for wealth, scheming for the right match, people sent packing. Was I watching another episode of a reality TV show?

Nope. This was a wonderful production of the North American Tour of “Fiddler on the Roof” playing in Atlanta through Sunday, March 21. The gravelly voiced, Tony-award winning Harvey Fierstein plays the role of Tevye. I’d read he had been hesitant to take the role, but he shines in the role of the milkman with too little money and too many daughters.

Even though it’s set in Russia in 1905, who doesn’t relate to the lyrics of “If I Were a Rich Man” these days? We may not dream of filling our yards with chicks and turkeys and geese and ducks, or having a double chin, but we all fantasize exactly what we would do if we had a little extra cash. Me? I’d like a beautiful set of Hartmann luggage and a car built after the first George Bush was president.

Which kinda brings me to the point of the whole show for me. So maybe a lot of us don’t have as much as we once did, and have had to let go of life’s little luxuries. But as I watched the heart-breaking end of the play when the entire town of Anatevka is told to leave in three days and the families are packing up to leave, I thought of what I’d take with me in the same situation. And I realized that beyond photos, my kid’s baby books and my mother’s jewelry, not much. So doesn’t that mean I really already have everything I need? Hardly a novel thought, but one it’s good to think about now and then. Like when Golda and Tevya sing the song “Do You Love Me?” After agreeing that they do love each other, they sing together:

It doesn’t change a thing
But even so
After twenty-five years
It’s nice to know

After Atlanta, the show travels to DC, Appleton, WI; Denver, Seattle and Cleveland. For more information visit www.fiddlerontour.com

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This entry was published on March 18, 2010 at 5:20 pm. It’s filed under Jan Schroder, Theater and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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